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Hangover treatment

A hangover is the unpleasant symptoms a person has after drinking too much alcohol.

Symptoms can include:

  • Headache and dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Fatigue
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Depression, anxiety and irritability

Tips for safe drinking and preventing a hangover:

  • Drink alcohol-containing drinks slowly and on a full stomach. If you are a small person, the effects of alcohol are greater on you than on a larger person.
  • Drink alcohol-containing drinks in moderation. Women should have no more than 1 drink per day and men no more than 2 drinks per day. One drink is defined as 12 fluid ounces (360 milliliters) of beer that has about 5% alcohol, 5 fluid ounces (150 milliliters) of wine that has about 12% alcohol, or 1 1/2 fluid ounces (45 milliliters) of 80-proof liquor.
  • Drink a glass of water in between drinks containing alcohol. This will help you drink less alcohol and decrease dehydration from drinking alcohol.
  • Avoid alcohol completely to prevent hangovers.

If you have a hangover, consider the following for relief:

  • Certain measures, such as fruit juice or honey, have been recommended to treat a hangover. But there is very little scientific evidence to show that such measures help. Recovery from a hangover is usually just a matter of time. Most hangovers are gone within 24 hours.
  • Electrolyte solutions (such as sports drinks) and bouillon soup are good for replacing the salt and potassium you lose from drinking alcohol.
  • Get plenty of rest. Even if you feel good the morning after heavy drinking, the lasting effects of alcohol reduce your ability to perform at your best.
  • Avoid taking any medicines for your hangover that contain acetaminophen (such as Tylenol). Acetaminophen may cause liver damage when combined with alcohol.

References

Finnell JT. Alcohol-related disease. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 142.

O'Connor PG. Alcohol use disorders. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 30.

Vlad I. Alcohol-related illness. In: Cameron P, Little M, Mitra B, Deasy C, eds. Textbook of Adult Emergency Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 21.4.

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      Hangover remedies

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      • Hangover remedies

        Hangover remedies

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      Review Date: 4/24/2021

      Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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